Speed of Life

Studio Notes From the Contemporary Artist Gregg Chadwick

Please join me this Saturday, July 26, 2014 at the Sandra Lee Gallery in San Francisco as I gather with a small group to discuss my new series “Revenant” - each painting holds a mysterious story where past and present meet. The event runs from 3:30 to 6:00 pm. Also, if you haven’t seen it yet, please check out the review by Jeffrey Carlson in Fine Art Connoisseur: "Gregg Chadwick’s Revenant" (link here) before my talk.

More details below:

Film Review - Genorisity of Eye: Art Transformed into Education

by Gregg Chadwick

 

Generosity of Eye: Art Transformed into Education from brad hall (Full Film)

Generosity of Eye: Art Transformed into Education is a must watch documentary by Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Brad Hall that documents William Louis-Dreyfus, Julia’s father,  as he explains why he decided to sell his bountiful art collection to benefit the Harlem Children’s Zone - an educational program in New York, created by Geoffrey Canada to break the cycle of generational poverty for the thousands of children and their families in the Harlem community. 

Julia is often on screen with her father and their scenes together are rich with familial affection. As Julia interviews her father about the art that William has collected over the years and the artists who have created it, she is often overcome with emotion as she discovers the depth of her father’s passion for art and for justice.

Geoffrey Canada, William Louis-Dreyfus, and Julia Louis-Dreyfus  

Julia says, “Dad doesn’t just collect art, he collects the artists who create it.” For her entire life, Julia’s dad has collected paintings, sculptures, and works on paper. Currently, the collection has grown to over 3,000 pieces and includes artworks by Kandinsky, Dubuffet, Giacometti, George Grosz, Red Grooms, Robert Traylor, Catherine Murphy, Stone Roberts, Graham Nickson, Raymond Mason, Rackstraw Downes, Jean-Baptiste Sécheret, Nicola Hicks, Robert Birmelin, George Boorujy, Thornton Dial, and many others. 

In a telling scene in the film, William explains his thoughts on society’s reaction to injustice:  ”I think there are two types of people that make up our political outlook. One is a person who sees something happening and thinks that it might happen to him and therefore is worried about it. He notices it and thinks to himself,”That could happen to me.” Therefore, he is against the injustice that is happening to a third party. And then there is another kind of person who looks at the injustice and says to himself,”Thank the Lord that is not happening to me.” So the fact of it’s happening to another person he is for. He is for it psychologically because by virtue of this happening to another person, it’s not happening to him. The other guy is against it because when he sees it, he thinks it might happen to him. Therefore, he is against it.” 

William’s passions are inspiring: art, justice, and humanity.

Rachel Carson’s Powerful Legacy

Today’s Google doodle honors the groundbreaking environmentalist Rachel Carson, whose book Silent Spring sounded one of the first alarms about the detrimental effect of pesticides on the eco-system. The natural world was my first love as a kid and reading Carson’s work was instrumental in spurring me on to look deeply at and respect the complexities of our endangered environment.

 

Carson’s interest in conservation began with her early work as a marine biologist, which led to her award winning book, The Sea Around Us. Subsequently, nature writing provided a powerful vehicle for Carson to bring mainstream attention to the chemicals being dumped daily into our streams and rivers. Her work inspired global bans of the pesticide DDT  and helped foster the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency in the United States.

 

I encourage you to honor Rachel Carson’s legacy by spending some time today on the Audubon Society’s website, the US National Park Service’s site, or your local nature conservancies information boards. All of these sites provide important information on how you can get involved and help preserve our natural world for future generations.

Santa Barbara Elegy

Gregg Chadwick
Buddha of the Adriatic
24”x18” oil on linen 2014 

My heart breaks for the families who have lost their daughters and sons during this weekend’s senseless massacre in Santa Barbara. There is so much to discuss, to argue over, to ponder. But tonight, I will continue to mourn and ask that attention be focused on the six University of California, Santa Barbara students who were stolen from us.